Mental, Physical, and Spiritual Health — a Trifecta of Wellness

Mental, Physical, and Spiritual Health — a Trifecta of Wellness

Did you know that about half of people with a substance use disorder also have a mental health issue — and vice versa? The connection between your physical and psychological health is strong, and we’re going to add a third component — your spiritual health.

Tres Vistas Recovery, which means three views recovery, is named for these three crucial components of your overall wellness. One of the primary reasons behind our excellent track record in helping people overcome addiction is that Dr. Daniel Headrick and our team focus on mental, physical, and spiritual health together.

Spiritual health

We’ll first spend some time discussing the less tangible of the three-sided equation — spirituality. What we mean by spirituality is finding and connecting to a higher power or purpose that’s greater than yourself. This isn’t necessarily about God, which might be your higher power, but whatever it is that gives you a broader perspective on life.

Spirituality is so important when you have a substance use disorder because the condition has likely taken over your life — almost everything you do centers around using or drinking.

As a result, you spend an enormous amount of your time trying (mostly unsuccessfully) to control a life that’s been essentially hijacked.

When you focus on spirituality, you start understanding that much is out of your control, and you can surrender your struggle to something more powerful. This release effectively diminishes the role that alcohol or drugs have long played in your life as you refocus.

Again, spirituality isn’t to be confused with religion, but rather, finding a different focus and perspective for your life.

For our part, we help provide you with some tools for improving spirituality, such as yoga, breath work, music therapy, and even wolf therapy, which underscores a powerful and ancient animal-human connection.

Mental health

As mentioned, substance use disorders and mental health issues often go hand-in-hand. People drink or use to self-medicate against an existing mental health issue or to forget a previous trauma. Going in the other direction, people with a substance use disorder are more prone to developing mental health issues, such as anxiety and major depressive disorder.

This close association makes us feel that mental health services are critical for any good recovery program, which is why we offer comprehensive therapy and counseling.

Physical health

Most of our clients arrive in relatively poor physical health due to substance use disorder. We believe that a healthy body is crucial for a successful recovery, which is why we offer:

As well, we focus on ways in which you can strengthen your body through exercise.

We believe that this three-pronged approach to your wellness — spiritual, mental, and physical — will give you the tools you need to lead your best life and one free from addiction and dependence.

If you’d like to learn more, please contact our office in San Juan Capistrano, California, to speak to one of our highly skilled team members.

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