Why is Medically Assisted Detox Important?

Why is Medically Assisted Detox Important?

Every day, you wake up and think that this is the day that you’re going to stop using, but your resolve quickly disappears as your brain starts its unrelenting demand. Even if you can weather your brain, your body might not respond well to the sudden withdrawal. 

The fact is that detoxing on your own is not only extremely hard, it can be very dangerous, which is why the team here at Tres Vistas Recovery offers help. Under the direction of Dr. Daniel Headrick, we offer support, as well as medically assisted treatments that can greatly ease the detox process, setting you more firmly on the road to recovery.

What happens when you detox

Whether you’re detoxing from alcohol, opioids, benzodiazepines, or some other substance, you can expect the process to be a bumpy one.

Depending upon how much you used or drank, and for how long, your withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe and, in some cases, be deadly.

At best, you may experience physical symptoms that include:

These symptoms depend upon what you’re trying to quit, but no matter which substance you’re battling, you can expect a host of mental symptoms as your body withdraws, namely uncontrollable cravings. These cravings are your brain’s way of making you miserable enough so that you pick up again, and they’re often strong enough to lead you to do just that, unless you have help.

At worst, withdrawing from certain substances can be downright dangerous. For example, suddenly withdrawing from alcohol or benzodiazepines can cause life-threatening seizures and hallucinations. When it comes to opioid withdrawal, our concern here is that, if you cave to your cravings, you may take far more than is necessary, leading to overdose.

For a full list of potential withdrawal symptoms from various substances, click here.

The easier way to detox

Through our medically assisted detox, we provide the tools you need to ease the withdrawal symptoms, setting you up for a far more successful effort.

These medications include:

While our medications can do their part to ease the physical withdrawal symptoms, such as nausea, vomiting, and body aches, they also tackle the relentless cravings. All too often, these cravings send people back to using in very short order unless they’re muted.

Please note that medications aren’t always appropriate and we thoroughly review your health and any other medications you may be taking before we go this route.

Outside of addressing your dependence and addiction through medications, we also provide NAD IV therapy, which can lessen withdrawal symptoms at the same time as it improves your overall wellness.

While the tools we mention above are highly effective, the emotional and mental support that we provide during your detox is also very important. Detoxing on your own can make you feel isolated and lonely and our goal is to show you that you’re not alone and that you do have support.

The bottom line is that even the strongest among us can benefit from professional support during detox, whether it’s medical, mental, or emotional.

If you’d like to learn more about how to detox safely and successfully, contact our office in San Juan Capistrano, California, to schedule a consultation.

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